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Waist circumference and elevated risk of obesity-related dementia

Waist circumference is a more accurate indicator of abdominal visceral fat level than BMI in the elderly, according to researchers from Korea University Guro Hospital. The study is the first large-scale cohort to examine the association of late-life waist circumference with the incidence of dementia in an older population.

Cleveland Clinic calculator estimates ten-year risk of T2DM complications

A new risk calculator developed by Cleveland Clinic researchers can show patients who are struggling with type 2 diabetes and obesity their risks of developing major health complications over the next ten years depending on which course of treatment they choose. The research was presented as one of the Top 10 studies at the ObesityWeek 2019 international conference in Las Vegas.

Cancer risk increases for individuals who are overweight before 40

The risk of cancer increases considerably if a person gains weight before the age of 40 with the risk of endometrial cancer increasing by 70 percent, according to an international study, headed by researchers from University of Bergen, Norway.

“Obesity is an established risk factor for several cancers,” said Professor Tone Bjørge, University of Bergen. “In this study, we have focused on the degree, timing and duration of overweight and obesity in relation to cancer risk.”

Surgery associated with lower risk of death and heart complications

Researchers from the Cleveland Clinic have found that bariatric and metabolic surgery performed in patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity is associated with a lower risk of death and major adverse cardiovascular events than usual medical care. These patients also lost more weight, had better diabetes control, and used fewer medications for treatment of their diabetes and cardiovascular disease than those undergoing usual medical care.

Excess body fat increases the risk of depression

Carrying ten kilograms of excess body fat increases the risk of depression by seventeen per cent and the more fat, the greater the probability of developing depression, these are the conclusion from a new study by researchers from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.

Weight loss prior to surgery may not be safe for all patients

Weight loss prior to metabolic and bariatric surgery may not be necessary for all patients and unsafe weight loss prior to surgery may compromise nutrition status and lead to increased infection rates, according to researchers from the University of Pennsylvania.

Risk of obesity influenced by changes in genes

A child's risk of obesity as they grow up can be influenced by modifications to their DNA prior to birth, a new University of Southampton study has shown. These changes, known as epigenetic modifications, control the activity of our genes without changing the actual DNA sequence. One of the main epigenetic modifications is DNA methylation, which plays a key role in the development of the embryo and the formation of different cell types, regulating when and where genes are switched on.

Sutures more effective than clips for mesenteric defect closures

Closure of the mesenteric defects using either non-absorbable metal clips or non-absorbable running sutures is a safe and effective measure to reduce the risk for small bowel obstruction after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery, according to researchers from the Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. However, they noted that sutures appear slightly more effective and should remain gold standard for mesenteric defects closure.

Women with obesity linked with increased risk of early-onset CRC

Women who are overweight or have obesity have up to twice the risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) before age 50 as women who have what is considered a ‘normal’ BMI, according to new research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis.

Obstructive sleep apnoea associated with higher risk of gout

People with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) have a higher risk of developing gout, even beyond the first years after being diagnosed with the sleep disorder, according to researchers from Keele University, UK. OSA is associated with a range of serious comorbidities, and it has previously been shown that people with OSA have a higher risk of developing gout in the first year after diagnosis.

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