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GI Windows raises US$16.4 million for Incision-less Anastomosis System

Mon, 09/14/2020 - 08:46
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GI Windows Medical, a clinical-stage, privately-held medical device company, has raised US$16.4 million Series A-1 financing. The financing attracted Johnson & Johnson Innovation along with Sonder Capital, GT Healthcare, JC Investco and one additional strategic investor. In addition to the institutional financing, GI Windows also received investments from existing shareholders as well as new investors, the Kennedy Trust and Coleman Trust. The proceeds will be used to support further product development and clinical studies for GI Window’s patented technology.

"We are excited by the support of our investors” said Brian Tinkham, President and Chief Executive Officer of GI Windows. “Our team continues to reinvent the future of healthcare with product development and demonstrating consistent efficacy and safety in our clinical trials. We are on an unwavering mission to improve clinical outcomes and reduce healthcare costs for patients and providers.”

GI Windows is developing the first fundamental breakthrough in anastomoses technology in both delivery and tissue fusion – the Incision-less Anastomosis System (IAS). According to the company, this technology enables an endoscopic (non-surgical) procedure that can divert a portion of ingested food from the proximal to distal small bowel, providing a less-invasive approach to achieve comparable long-term metabolic benefits as those seen in bariatric surgery. The GI Windows procedure is intended to be done on a same-day, outpatient basis, and with no surgical incisions.

The company’s innovation creates an anastomosis using a slender, linear device, that can be loaded in the channel of a standard endoscope or a thin conduit, such as a catheter or needle. As the device is deployed from the scope or catheter, it self-assembles to form a large, octagonal shape.

When two of these devices are deployed in adjacent hollow organs, the devices join together and form a compression anastomosis, without the need for staples, sutures, or surgical access (Figure 1).  

Figure 1: Two standard endoscopes are used to access the small bowel. Self-forming magnets are deployed from the working channel of each endoscope (Credit GI Windows).
Figure 1: Two standard endoscopes are used to access the small bowel. Self-forming magnets are deployed from the working channel of each endoscope (Credit GI Windows).
 

The GI Windows invention leverages the science already demonstrated with compression-based anastomotic techniques. This approach uses the body’s own healing processes to remodel tissue between two structure to form an anastomosis between two structures. With the GI Windows technology, this anastomosis can be large, patent, and created without surgical access.   

The dual-path enteral diversion was created with a flexible endoscope, as smart, magnetic devices are deployed from the scope and self-assemble in the small bowel. The devices transform from a linear shape to an octagonal geometry and then couple to form an anastomosis - a connection between two hollow or tubular structures or organs (Figure 2). The coupled devices are eventually expelled naturally, leaving behind an anastomosis without residual foreign material.

Figure 2: The devices are connected to create a compression anastomosis. When the anastomosis fully-formed, the devices are passed. A treatment path is created, bypassing a portion of the small bowel (Credit GI Windows).
Figure 2: The devices are connected to create a compression anastomosis. When the anastomosis fully-formed, the devices are passed. A treatment path is created, bypassing a portion of the small bowel (Credit GI Windows).
 

“We are thrilled to have this opportunity to support GI Windows in the development of GI Window’s transformative technology. We believe this technology will set a new standard by improving safety, accelerating healing and reducing post-surgical complications,” said John Cammett, Managing Director of JC Investco.

“The GI Windows technology has the potential to create a new paradigm for assessing risk profiles in surgical procedures, improving access to care and enabling new procedures to make a tremendous impact on patients.” said Andy McGibbon, Partner at Sonder Capital. “The Sonder Capital team is excited to continue as part of this story.”