Negative attitudes around weight gain are pervasive in the NHS

The UK's National Health Service (NHS) needs to do more to address the ingrained stigma and discrimination faced by people with obesity, according to Dr Stuart Flint, Associate Professor in the Psychology of Obesity at the University of Leeds, who believes that negative attitudes around weight gain are pervasive in the NHS and they can affect the way patients are treated.

Mice brain cells change shape after a meal impacting satiety

Researchers from the CNRS, Inrae, University of Burgundy, Université de Paris, Inserm and University of Luxembourg have just revealed the mechanisms in the brain that lead to feelings of satiety after eating – and involve a series of reactions triggered by a rise in blood glucose levels.  The study, ‘Postprandial Hyperglycemia Stimulates Neuroglial Plasticity in Hypothalamic POMC Neurons after a Balanced Meal’,  which was conducted on mice, was published in Cell Reports.

Researchers produce proteins that reduce excess levels of triglycerides

Researchers Mark Castleberry, a doctoral student, and professor Sean Davidson, both in the UC College of Medicine, have found a way to produce Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA 5) protein in the laboratory. It plays an important role in metabolising and clearing excess levels of triglycerides from the bloodstream. Their findings, ‘Functional recombinant apolipoprotein A5 that is stable at high concentrations at physiological pH’, were published in the Journal of Lipid Research.

Negative attitudes around weight gain are pervasive in the NHS

The UK's National Health Service (NHS) needs to do more to address the ingrained stigma and discrimination faced by people with obesity, according to Dr Stuart Flint, Associate Professor in the Psychology of Obesity at the University of Leeds, who believes that negative attitudes around weight gain are pervasive in the NHS and they can affect the way patients are treated.

Bariatric surgery reduces CRC risk in patients with obesity

Bariatric surgery significantly reduces colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in patients with obesity to the extent that they share the same risk of colorectal cancer as the general population, according to researchers from Université Côte d’Azur, Nice, France. However, for patients with obesity who do not undergo bariatric surgery, the risk is 34% above that of the general population.