Studies reveal obesity and opioid prescriptions association

Two new studies from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) shed light on the relationship between obesity and the use of prescription opioids in the United States. One study reported that joint pain, back pain, injury, and muscle/nerve pain, which prior studies have linked with obesity, emerged as important types of pain in explaining excess prescription opioid use among adults with obesity.

Unconscious food cravings may counteract surgery for patients with superobesity

Patients with superobesity (BMI>50) are prone to unconscious food impulses and cravings that may make it challenging for them to maintain weight loss after bariatric surgery, according to Brazilian research that was accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020 (the Endocrine Society's annual meeting that was cancelled due to the COVIUD-19 pandemic) and will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

Majority of internists-in-training feel ill-equipped to treat obesity

Most resident physicians training in internal medicine do not feel adequately prepared to manage obesity in their patients, according to the results of a survey from Stanford University researchers. The results were accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020 (the Endocrine Society's annual meeting that was cancelled due to the COVIUD-19 pandemic) and will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

Bariatric surgery may be effective treatment for NAFLD

Bariatric surgery may be an effective treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to Portuguese research that was accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020 (the Endocrine Society's annual meeting that was cancelled due to the COVIUD-19 pandemic) and will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

Critical care team develops blueprint for essential surgery

As patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) flood hospitals, the health care system must not only determine how to redeploy limited resources and staff to care for them but must also make well-calculated decisions to provide other types of critical care. For surgeons, this type of critical care involves performing an emergency operation to treat a ruptured appendix or perforated colon, to both virus-exposed and non-exposed patients, while keeping both hospital personnel and non-exposed patients safe.