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swedish obese subjects

SOS study: bariatric surgery guidelines need updating

The latest review of data from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) trial has called for current guidelines for bariatric surgery to be updated, to improve access for those patients who are most likely to benefit from surgery.

Surgery has “impressive” effect on cardiac factors

The largest ever systematic review of studies into the relationship between bariatric surgery and cardiovascular function has concluded that surgery has an “impressive” effect on cardiac risk factors, and that no pharmacological treatment has shown a similar effect over such short time periods.

Post-surgical uric acid changes driven by weight loss

The latest paper from the Swedish Obese Subjects study group has reported that fluctuations in uric acid levels following bariatric surgery appear to be driven by the weight losses and gains, independent of the patient’s genetic makeup.

Bypass has long-term effects on hypertension

Gastric bypass surgery leads to better long-term resolution of hypertension than purely restrictive methods of surgery, according to a the latest paper from the Swedish Obese Subjects research group, published in Plos One.

The researchers also found a diuretic effect related to gastric bypass independent of weight loss.

Journal watch - 29/11/12

This week: fixed versus changing surgical teams, key results from the Swedish Obese Subjects study, and changes in the makeup of bariatric surgery.

CTAF supports diabetic surgery for BMI>35 patients

The California Technology Assessment Forum (CTAF) has published a document assessing the use of bariatric surgery to treat type 2 diabetes, finding evidence of its safety and effectiveness in diabetics with a BMI over 35, but asserting that there is inadequate evidence to recommend its use in diabetics under that weight.

Lower long-term drug costs for surgical patients

Patients who have bariatric surgery use fewer medications to treat diabetes and cardiovascular disease resulting in lower overall drug costs, according to the latest paper from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

From year seven to 20, the surgery group incurred a mean annual drug cost of US$930; the control patients, US$1,123 (adjusted difference, −US$228; 95% CI, -US$335 to −US$121; p<0.001).

Swedish Obese Subjects: surgery prevents diabetes

Bariatric surgery is twice as effective as lifestyle changes at preventing type 2 diabetes in people who are obese, according to the latest paper from the Swedish Obese Subjects study. The outcomes revealed that surgery reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 78%, double the effect of diet and exercise alone.

Bariatric surgery prevents cardiovascular events

Patients who undergo gastric bypass surgery are less likely to die from cardiovascular events than people who receive more conventional treatment for their weight condition, according to the latest results from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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