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Polycystic ovarian syndrome

PCOS doesn’t affect bariatric surgery outcomes

Gastric bypass in obese women with PCOS results in significant weight, BMI, blood pressure and hypoglycaemia reductions

A study presented at the Society for Endocrinology’s annual conference in Harrogate, UK, has found that polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) has no significant effect on the outcomes of bariatric surgery

The paper, ‘Effectiveness of bariatric surgery in women with and without polycystic ovarian syndrome’, from the Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Manchester, reported that gastric bypass surgery in obese women with PCOS results in significant reductions in weight, BMI, blood pressure and hypoglycaemia.

Previous studies have reported that the prevalence of clinical obesity in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome ranges between 30-60%. Weight loss has proved effective at enhancing insulin sensitivity, reducing hyperandrogenaemia, improving hirsutism and restoring menstrual regularity and fertility in women with the condition.

Despite this, women with polycystic ovarian syndrome appear to be less responsive to weight loss interventions including some bariatric procedures. Therefore, the investigators decided to compare weight loss outcomes of gastric bypass surgery in women with and without polycystic ovarian syndrome.

They performed a retrospective, comparative cohort analysis of weight loss, blood pressure and hypoglycaemia following gastric bypass surgery in the two groups (28 patients in each group), which were matched for age (mean 28.5 ± 5 years) and pre-operative BMI (mean 50.0 ±5). There were no significant differences (mean weight 137.5kg, systolic and diastolic blood pressure 135 and 85mmHg respectively, and HbA1c 37mmol/mol) between the two groups.

Following surgery, there was significant weight loss in both groups. Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome lost slightly more weight, but not to a statistically significant degree (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Weight loss following gastric bypass surgery in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (blue circles) and without (red squares).

The researchers also reported significant reductions in BMI, blood pressure and hypoglycaemia levels following surgery in both groups with no significant difference between the groups.

They concluded that gastric bypass surgery in obese women with polycystic ovarian syndrome results in similar outcomes to women without the condition.

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