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Diabetes

US study reports diabetes rates are levelling off

According to the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report from the CDC, around 29.1 million adults in the US (or 9.3% of the population) have diabetes, bout 30 percent of those people are undiagnosed
Both prevalence and incidence increased sharply during 1990-2008 before levelling off with no significant change during 2008-2012

The rate of diabetes in the US plateaued between 2008 and 2012, according to a study ‘Prevalence and Incidence Trends for Diagnosed Diabetes Among Adults Aged 20 to 79 Years, United States, 1980-2012’, published in JAMA. The study authors speculate that reasons for the potential slowing of the increase in type 2 diabetes may include a slowing in the rate of obesity.

The study lead by Dr Linda S Geiss of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, and colleagues is thought to be one of the first systematic studies to examine the prevalence and incidence of diabetes in the US.

The researchers analysed 12 year data (from 1980-2012) for 664,969 adults ages 20 to 79 years from the National Health Interview Survey and determined the annual percentage change in rates of the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes (type 1 and type 2 combined).

During 1980-2012, the trends in age-adjusted prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the overall population were similar to those for age-adjusted incidence. The prevalence per 100 persons was 3.5 in 1990, 7.9 in 2008, and 8.3 in 2012. The incidence per 1,000 persons was 3.2 in 1990, 8.8 in 2008, and 7.1 in 2012. Both prevalence and incidence increased sharply during 1990-2008 (for prevalence, 4.5 percent, for incidence, 4.7 percent) before levelling off with no significant change during 2008-2012 (for prevalence, 0.6 percent, for incidence, -5-4 percent).

Although the incidence and prevalence of diabetes ceased growing or levelled off in many population subgroups, the incidence continued to increase in Hispanic and non-Hispanic black adults and prevalence continued to grow among those with a high school education or less.

"This threatens to exacerbate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in diabetes prevalence and incidence,” the authors write. “Furthermore, in light of the well-known excess risk of amputation, blindness, end-stage renal disease, disability, mortality, and health care costs associated with diabetes, the doubling of diabetes incidence and prevalence ensures that diabetes will remain a major public health problem that demands effective prevention and management programs.”

According to the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report from the CDC, around 29.1 million adults in the US (or 9.3% of the population) have diabetes, bout 30 percent of those people are undiagnosed.

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