Most recent update: Thursday, December 12, 2019 - 11:42

Bariatric News - Cookies & privacy policy

You are here

Gut microbiome fermentation

Gut microbiome fermentation, exercise and pre-diabetics

The researchers suggest their experiment gives evidence of the gut microbiome playing a role in glucose metabolism and degree of sensitivity to insulin

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in China has found that the makeup of the gut microbiome can be a determiner for the efficacy of exercise in volunteers with pre-diabetics. Type 2 diabetes is considered to be preventable in most people – and can be achieved with a change in diet and an increase in exercise. However, as the study discovered, exercise does not always lead to reductions in glucose metabolism.

In the paper, ‘Gut Microbiome Fermentation Determines the Efficacy of Exercise for Diabetes Prevention’, published in Cell Metabolism, the team asked 39 male prediabetic volunteers to undergo glucose metabolism and gut microbe testing. Then the group was divided into two - 20 volunteers were asked to undergo an exercise regimen for three months and 19 were asked to maintain their normal eating and exercise habits. At the end of the three-month period, all of the volunteers once again underwent glucose and gut microbe metabolic testing.

The researchers report that only 70 percent of the volunteers who carried out the exercise regimen saw improvements in glucose metabolism and changes in sensitivity to insulin. None of those in the sedentary group saw any improvement. The researchers also report that they found differences in the gut microbiomes between those who followed the exercise regimen - those who had reductions in glucose metabolism were also generating more short-chain fatty acids. They were also doing a better job breaking down branched chain amino acids.

Visual abstract (Credit: Cell Metabolism)

The researchers also transplanted faecal samples from the volunteers into obese test mice. They found that those mice that received such samples from the volunteers who saw improvements in glucose metabolism developed better insulin resistance, none of the other mice saw any improvements.

The researchers suggest their experiment gives evidence of the gut microbiome playing a role in glucose metabolism and degree of sensitivity to insulin. This, they further suggest, indicates faecal transplants may be a viable option for people who do not gain glucose metabolism benefits from exercise.

Want more stories like this? Subscribe to Bariatric News!

Bariatric News
Keep up to date! Get the latest news in your inbox. NOTE: Bariatric News WILL NOT pass on your details to 3rd parties. However, you may receive ‘marketing emails’ sent by us on behalf of 3rd parties.