Most recent update: Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - 16:32

Bariatric News - Cookies & privacy policy

You are here

IL-36 cytokines proteins and T2DM

IL-36 cytokines proteins associated with better T2DM control

IL-36 cytokines are members of a larger family of proteins known as the interleukin-1 family which have emerged as central players in the development of obesity related disease

Scientists from the School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, have discovered a family of proteins that are associated with lower blood sugar levels among obese patients with type 2 diabetes. The study showed that patients with type 2 diabetes who have high levels of the protein, IL-36 cytokines, were found to have lower blood sugar levels, implying that those proteins are associated with better control of the patient's blood sugar levels and their disease.

IL-36 cytokines are members of a larger family of proteins known as the interleukin-1 family which have emerged as central players in the development of obesity related disease. Researchers have linked the protective effects of these proteins with their ability to alter the make-up of the intestinal microbiome.

Obesity causes an increased level of fatty acids and inflammation leading to insulin resistance. When the body is resistant to the insulin it produces it causes a high build-up of glucose or blood sugar, ultimately leading to type 2 diabetes.

the Trinity research team believe that there is an urgent need to achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms associated with obesity related diseases.

"This study has added to a substantial body of work which has revealed the important function of the broader interleukin-1 family as mediators of metabolic health and disease,” said lead scientist, Dr Patrick Walsh from the School of Medicine, Trinity. “Our findings have opened the door to a deeper investigation of how IL-36 cytokines impact on the development of such diseases in humans and whether this can be exploited for the better treatment of patients."

The study, ‘Interleukin-36 cytokines alter the intestinal microbiome and can protect against obesity and metabolic dysfunction’, was published in Nature Communications.

To access this paper, please click here

Want more stories like this? Subscribe to Bariatric News!

Bariatric News
Keep up to date! Get the latest news in your inbox. NOTE: Bariatric News WILL NOT pass on your details to 3rd parties. However, you may receive ‘marketing emails’ sent by us on behalf of 3rd parties.